Generation Brexit

Are we living in a post-truth society?

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During the Brexit vote both sides of the argument espoused empirically unsubstantiated claims. The Remain campaign warned of impending economic meltdown right after the vote to exit the EU – that did not happen. The Leave campaign notoriously promised that Brexit would enable the UK to restore the sovereignty of the Parliament. It now turns out that government minters will be able to amend repatriated EU legislation as they wish. Boris Johnson famously promised to ‘take control’ over the £350 million a week we ‘send to Brussels’ (UK’s contributions to the EU budget). We knew then that the net sum was actually around £156 million. We now know that the UK will end up paying into EU’s coffers long after it exits.

Was the proliferation of these threats and promises a hallmark of a post-truth society?

What role did social media platforms play in proliferating these unsubstantiated claims?
• Have people really had enough of experts, as Michael Gove had claimed?
• Was #ProjectFear an example of misinformation or disinformation?

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  What is now being referred to as 2016’s ‘Word of the year’, post-truth is anything but a new phenomena. The oxford dictionary defines it as 'relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief'. It may be a phrase made popular in 2016, but the concept of post-truth is in no way a ‘new one’. People have always chosen to believe what they want to, often placing their ideals and principle...

Megha Thakker
by Megha Thakker
1 Votes
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Megha Thakker

There can be little to doubt as to whether we are living in a post-truth society with regards to the proliferation of fake news and declining trust in experts and essential institutions. We cannot question whether this has influenced Brexit or US elections, because obviously it has, even if the degree of its impact is subject to debate. The real question we should be asking is whether we value truth or not, rather than blame others posting fake news on social media, that then influences our...

Areesh Hasnani
by Areesh Hasnani
1 Votes
Comments 0
Areesh Hasnani

For the majority of people in my age bracket (18-21) the main problem lies is merely  misinformed  decision making. For individuals to have a concise and well informed opinion on a matter, it is absolutely vital to be informed on both sides of the story and argument. It is not enough to log onto a social media platform, see what Ben, Nick and Sarah have posted and formulate ones own opinion solely off these platforms (whilst being subconsciously influenced through the views of peers at the...

Frishta Abadi
by Frishta Abadi
1 Votes
Comments 0
Frishta Abadi

I believe we are currently in a post-truth society represented by the Brexit vote and the US 2016 elections. The outcome of these elections were deeply affected by fake news and manipulation. I believe the term post-truth however is not adequate as I do not believe there has ever been a truth society. I believe the fake news crisis currently affecting our social and political lives is due to the emergence of a new form of media, the internet. A similar crisis was observed with the emergence...

Marco Longhini
by Marco Longhini
1 Votes
Comments 0
Marco Longhini

During the lead up to the 2016 EU referendum, the term “Project Fear” was used to denote the scaremongering tactics and general pessimistic tone implemented by those in favor of remaining in the EU. Before one can definitively label “Project Fear” as an example of either misinformation or disinformation we must first define these terms and understand the distinction between the two. Disinformation is the deliberate dissemination of intentionally false/inaccurate information in an attempt to...

Charlie Dimond
by Charlie Dimond
2 Votes
Comments 0
Charlie Dimond

With the ever increasing rise in technology use, comes an increase in the number of people on social media, and with an estimated 1.33bn active users visiting Facebook daily (as of the second quarter of 2017), a greater proportion of the world are being exposed to the information they see on it. An increasing proportion of younger people are joining social media forms and they have opened themselves up to a much wider array of information both directly and indirectly. They may not have the...

Nik
by Nik
4 Votes
Comments 0
Nik
by
Nik

The Remain campaign did wrongly assert that economic catastrophe would happen right after Brexit, which can perhaps be seen as a sort of economic fear-mongering. However, I believe that it is important to establish a difference in intention and context between Leave and Remain campaigns- they seem to have contributed in very different ways to creating a 'post-truth' environment. Warnings about economic catastrophe were based on expert assessment of negative economic impacts on the UK...

Yi Tan
by Yi Tan
1 Votes
Comments 0
Yi Tan
by
Yi Tan

By definition, to live in a post-truth society is to imply that there once existed a truth society. Although the term post-truth is a nice catch-all for the growing prominence of fake news and the increasing influence of unprofessional political commentary (particularly through social media), bias political campaigning has been a regular feature on our democratic landscape. To even imply that one could live in a truth society is incompatible with the principles of democratic debate and free...

Rory Gillis
by Rory Gillis
2 Votes
Comments 0
Rory Gillis

While many regard information as being toothless in terms of the actual impact it can have on society, its effects are insidious and heavily damaging in many spheres -- political, economic or social. With regards to the specific situation of Brexit, such false figures brandished around by key political figures such as Boris Johnson would have likely affected public opinion -- given how the media latched on to it and sensationalised his claims, the outreach of his inaccurate comments would...

Tommy Sin
by Tommy Sin
4 Votes
Comments 0
Tommy Sin

The title is a quote from former President George Bush when speaking about his political opponents. To me this shows that in elections, particularly ones for a single person as opposed to a party, it is the person who is able to talk to the people in their own words and successfully convey their political objectives as opposed to those who seek to articulate their political philosophy as if it were to an Oxbridge debating soc meeting. This can have consequences as although George Bush was...

Yan
by Yan
5 Votes
Comments 0
Yan
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Yan
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