Generation Brexit

What should happen now that MPs have rejected Theresa May's deal?

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On Tuesday 15 January, MPs rejected the Withdrawal Agreement by a margin of 230 votes. 

Here is a summary of possible scenarios https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46320368

We want to know what you think the UK should do  now that MPs have voted overwhelmingly against the Withdrawal Agreement is rejected.

  • The UK tries to renegotiate with the EU? This appears to be May's current position. Do you think she will secure sufficient concessions to get a somewhat revised deal through a second vote?
  • A vote of confidence in the British government? Jeremy Corbyn has already tried this once and was unsuccessful. Should Labour try again, and if so when?
  • Theresa May resigns or is replaced as Prime Minister? So far, May has promised to continue to lead the government. Do you agree with her decision?
  • MPs have a series of "free votes" to see what options might command a majority in the House of Commons?
  • MPs from across the different parties take control of the Brexit process?
  • The people decide in either a general election or another referendum? 
  • The UK seeks an extension to the article 50 timeline (beyond the current March 2019 deadline)?
  • The UK joins the EEA (the so called Norway option)?
  • The UK crashes out of the EU (leave without a deal) in March 2019?
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THeresa May lost her best tool. The EU’s decision to grant her more time has actually weakened her I believe. 

Alexander Dossche
by Alexander Dossche
0 Votes
Comments 0
Alexander Dossche

The final push has begun and before the vote we now see the Conservatives swinging the big numbers, as hammond promises to be able to release billions for stretched public services when eurosceptics drop their reservations about the Irish backstop. Do you think this is a convincing argument? 

Alexander Dossche
by Alexander Dossche
0 Votes
Comments 0
Alexander Dossche

Today Theresa May confirmed that the next vote in parliament will be held by 12 March, just 17 days before Brexit day. Even if the deal is exactly the same, or only has very minor changes, maybe a majority of MPs will be more likely to vote for it no matter what, given that we will be on the edge of a no deal.

Alana Roberts
by Alana Roberts
2 Votes
Comments 2
Alana Roberts

Now that the MP's have rejected Theresa May's deal, they should start to prepare for the high possibility of no deal. They should start to prepare agreements with individual European Member States to ensure and maintain the protection of refugee and asylum seekers. 

Aaliyah Channer
by Aaliyah Channer
1 Votes
Comments 0
Aaliyah Channer

Not long ago, Nigel Farage spoke in the European Parliament about the way forward when there would be no deal. Even though I am not his biggest fan, there was a grain of truth in his question whether the EU and the UK were prepared to face each other under WTO rules. According to this article, there is insufficient preparation. Is there no ability to mend fences here? What if the UK and the EU start a separate commission to work on this issue and try together to work out how a WTO-based...

Alexander Dossche
by Alexander Dossche
1 Votes
Comments 0
Alexander Dossche

Uk To Leave Eu With No Brexit Deal Before 1st April 2019 @ 3/1 odds.

franz 92
by franz 92
2 Votes
Comments 1
franz 92
Idea thumbnail

Obviously, the PM needs a majority in parliament in order to pass her deal through. However, with 37% of her parliamentary colleagues, Labour standing firm in opposition, unlikely support from any other opposition, including the DUP, it's not looking very bright for May's deal.  Surely she recognises that whatever deal she will put through, will be dead in the water. What do you think? Could there be a possibility that it could get through? 

Ryan Murphy
by Ryan Murphy (Admin)
1 Votes
Comments 1
Ryan Murphy
by
Ryan Murphy (Admin)

The Guardian  reports that a revised Brexit deal will be returned to the Parliament for vote by 21st January 2019. What I am interested in is that although May recognized the lack of faith in her purposed deal, she rejected any amendment to her deal prior to yesterday, on which she called off today’s vote. Shadow Minister Burgon questioned that if PM May “is holding the country to ransom.” During today’s debate in the House, Mr. Corbyn even asked May to “make way” for others who are more...

Haoyu Xu
by Haoyu Xu
2 Votes
Comments 1
Haoyu Xu

Even though I would like to see a second referendum, I also recognize the numerous issues that it would bring. Especially in the political field, a second referendum would not bring about a resolution but only more issues. According to PM Theresa May's argument during the first day of Brexit deal debates, "what would a second referendum say to the British constituents?" What would it say about the state of UK’s democracy if the biggest vote in British history were to be rerun because a...

Alex Tai
by Alex Tai
3 Votes
Comments 2
Alex Tai

According to an advocate general of the European Court of Justice, the UK should theoretically be able to pull out of Article 50 and stop its withdrawal from the EU, if it chose to do so. Although this opinion is not binding and the ECJ has yet to deliver its final ruling, this is a promising development and possibility for the UK, as it is extremely unlikely PM May’s withdrawal plan will pass through Parliament. Instead of risking the possibility of a no-deal Brexit, the British government...

Jessica Wang
by Jessica Wang
1 Votes
Comments 0
Jessica Wang
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