Generation Brexit

Nice thought

The More the Merrier!

by
Elena Turci
Elena Turci | 4 months ago | in Custody Battles

EU and UK nationals have enjoyed since many years the benefits of being able to work and study abroad and mechanisms able to allow this are still in place.

Setting up a Visa or ECSTA system, would be more costly and likely to determine a sharp decrease in mobility, with bad economic consequences.

Of course, the same level of access has to be allowed by both parties. Therefore, UK should think carefully to its future immigration policy, assessing the consequences of the decisions taken.

Special attention should be devoted to:

- the  issue of UK older citizens living in Europe that may put a greater pressure on NHS, if forced to go back.

- the issue of EU nationals  working for NHS.

- the labour force needs of UK.

Michael Cottakis 4 months ago

Thanks for the great input Elena. In more specific terms, what future mechanism might allow high levels of "access" on both sides?

Reply 1

Elena Turci 4 months ago

To give an answer it would be necessary to know what the UK migration policy would look like. For the moment, what we know is what May declared at the Council, which was very vague and did not address the issue. I think the reaction of EU will depend on the level of 'openess' decided by UK, on the basis of what the UK public opinion is ready to accept.

From one side, UK does not want to be Brexit over-expensive. On the other side, Brexiters main arguments was related to cutting down on immigation. Therefore, it is a game that is going to be played in the UK court.

Reply 4

Marta Kochetkova 4 months ago

Just in case someone hasn't seen this yet, here are some articles on the latest announcements by May on EU citizens' rights in the UK post-Brexit, where she suggested these rights could be guaranteed in the international court of justice in The Hague: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jun...y-aim-of-brexit
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-40379663
https://www.ft.com/content/ab584960-57f3-11e7-80b6-9bfa4c1f83d2
http://news.sky.com/story/theresa-may-eu-citi...erious-10924507

Reply 0

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Arty Hart 4 months ago

Economically I agree that this is all vital, but how will it ever happen politically when many who voted to Leave primarily did so because they perceived the EU negatively due to high levels of immigration?

Reply 2

Elena Turci 4 months ago

Quoting from above: "From one side, UK does not want to be Brexit over-expensive. On the other side, Brexiters main arguments was related to cutting down on immigation. Therefore, it is a game that is going to be played in the UK court."

Therefore, first of all, UK has to understand what immigration policy does want, taking into account the disadvantages of cutting down on immigration. Ad then, the government has to find a way to not lead the country to the disaster of a shortage of labour force thanks to a restrictive immigration policy, convincing the public opinion of the advantages of migration.

I do not know if May will find a convincing argument for a more permissive immigration policy, Corbyn might.

Reply 1

Antone Christianson-Galina 4 months ago

Status changed to Nice thought

Reply 1

Marta Kochetkova 4 months ago

Here is an interesting article from BrexitCentral on the impact the ECJ could have on the rights of EU citizens resident in the UK post-Brexit: http://brexitcentral.com/eus-unacceptable-ecj...rior-rights-uk/

Reply 0

Lev Bronstein 4 months ago

Yeah I think that agreements to allow large numbers of EU workers to stay in the UK will really anger the hardcore Brexit voters who see them as stealing there jobs. While it is the humane and economically sensible action to take Im not sure how the government could pull that off without making those who voted for Brexit feel betrayed.

Reply 1

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