Generation Brexit

Sovereignty NOT Reclaimed

by
Alex Tai
Alex Tai | 7 months ago | in Our common future after Brexit

Numerous Brexiteers have cited lack of sovereignty as a motive for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union. Back in July 2018, PM May wrote a letter to her colleagues assuring them that the UK will take back control of its borders, money and laws.

(cont.)

edited on Dec 3, 2018 by Alex Tai

Alex Tai 7 months ago

Sources:
https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-po...agreement_0.pdf – Brexit deal
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/nov...rawal-agreement – key issues with Brexit deal
https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/brexit...ts-key-13591418 – key issues with Brexit deal
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-32810887 – All things Brexit
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46303751 – Brexit political declaration + key issues
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46237012 – key issues with Brexit deal
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-politics-44615404 – Irish backstop + issues
https://www.conservativehome.com/parliament/2...vative-mps.html – PM May’s letter/promise to Conservative MPs

Reply 1

Alex Tai 7 months ago

However, taking a look at the final Brexit deal, it does not seem like they have achieved their goal of regaining sovereignty. Major topics such as immigration, taxation, competition, trade and environmental commitments have been discreetly framed to assert EU influence in the United Kingdom.

Reply 0

Alex Tai 7 months ago

The Irish Backstop
The most controversial aspect of the deal is the Irish backstop and its underlying assumptions for the UK. Both the UK and EU have agreed that a hard border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland is not ideal. A hard border would mean physical barriers, customs check and regulations on goods travelling between the two territories. In the case where an agreement could not be reached, the backstop would serve as a last resort to prevent such hard border by keeping Northern Ireland within the EU single market and customs union. Implications of having only part of a country in a single customs union include regulating goods travelling from Great Britain into Northern Ireland. The backstop would also prevent the UK from freely lifting and levying tariffs. Essentially, the United Kingdom will be entrenched with the customs rules that it so desperately tries to exempt itself from. What exacerbates the issue of sovereignty is the fact that the UK would not be able to exit the backstop, and effectively the customs union, without the EU’s consent.

Reply 0

Alex Tai 7 months ago

Supremacy of the European Court of Justice
The Brexit deal also outlined how the UK’s transition period should be carried out. The logistics of the transition also serve as another major blow to the country’s attempt at securing sovereignty. Regarding law implementation, any statute passed by the European Court of Justice during this period would be valid on British soil. As for law interpretation, any disputes between the UK and the EU would refer to legal precedents from the European court. To make things worse, the United Kingdom would not have any representation in any of the EU legislative organs.

Has the Prime Minister delivered on her promises to reclaim sovereignty? It seems to me that numerous components of the proposed Brexit deal aim to create an illusion of independence rather than genuine autonomy.

Reply 0

Share