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The British economy, despite economic growth in the second quarter, is struggling to maintain strong levels of economic activity. The looming threat of a no-deal Brexit increases pressure on finances within households.

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
13 Votes
Comments 3
Nithya Reddy

Theresa May’s support within parliament is slowly waning. Leading Brexiteer in May’s Cabinet Michael Gove says May’s deal was riddled with imperfections and could lead to either “no Brexit at all” or another referendum altogether. The Labour party is now attempting to gain majority and push a general election if May’s deal fails. 

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
11 Votes
Comments 2
Nithya Reddy

Brexit, as it unfolds, is paradoxical in nature. Leave voters were primarily concerned with the shifting nature of the UK’s demographics; growing multiculturalism within Great Britain's borders sparked anti-immigrant backlash. The reality of Brexit is at its core an immigration problem.

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
10 Votes
Comments 5
Nithya Reddy

The childcare industry in the United Kingdom is overrepresented by migrant women. In the post-feminist paradigm, many working mothers are, essentially, reconciling family and work by outsourcing familial duties to ethnic, poorer women. 

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
11 Votes
Comments 3
Nithya Reddy

The British rentier class is only contributing to the income and wealth inequality that pushed the working class towards Brexit. The elite have a facade of understanding the power imbalances that affect those suffering, but more media attention is given to Remainers rather than Leavers in media outlets such as the Guardian. The economic rationales for both arguments are subsided by preconceived biases. The economic and political discourse surrounding Brexit seems as a cover for a grander...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
11 Votes
Comments 4
Nithya Reddy

11 Tories last night forced the cost comparisons between Theresa May's Brexit deal versus staying in EU. Then, the DUP, May's once allies in government, abstained from voting on the budget and even supported a Labour Party amendment. The government is deeply divided and the Conservative party has no grounds to engage a majority of parliament.  

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
10 Votes
Comments 4
Nithya Reddy

The British working class, as they saw it, were excited by trade opportunities with countries outside the European Union. Now that the trade with European countries is significantly more restricted, “leading Brexit campaigner Boris Johnson proposed adopting a Canada-style trade arrangement that would mean access to, but not membership of, the single market.” It would be the concern of other nations to establish trade with the United Kingdom because the European single market would no longer...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
9 Votes
Comments 4
Nithya Reddy

When understanding the leave argument, their economic rationality fell to short term effects provided from leaving the European Union. The United Kingdom would no longer be responsible for the economic wellbeing of multiple other countries. Greece undergoing its own financial crisis was significantly hurting Europe’s overall economy, triggering new age lending practices to aid Greece. This is obviously off putting to the United Kingdom, a global superhouse in its own right. In fact, Britain...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
10 Votes
Comments 0
Nithya Reddy

The concept of Brexit stems from extreme nationalism that is taking root in global superpowers. The sense of "otherness" that surrounds the migrant threat is a manifestation of this baseless fear of multiculturalism. Governments and politicians currently fail to represent the demographic of a shifting Britain. However, there will always be a white status quo that permeates throughout politics. Immigration policies are white-centered. The government right now needs to ensure diversity within...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
7 Votes
Comments 1
Nithya Reddy

The success of immigration policies can be measured by their impact on social cohesion and racial animosity. Multicultural policies in Great Britain aim to take diverse minority groups, define them as a homogenous community, and then dictate policies and needs according to that singular ideology. Accepting multicultural diversity meant the denunciation of certain aspects of minority culture, such as Islamic fundamentalism, because British diversity was a superficial acceptance of only the...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
9 Votes
Comments 2
Nithya Reddy

We live in a world where group identity transcends individual identity. In Britain, UK citizens seek a homogenous population rather than the tribalistic status quo. Multiculturalism in a highly divisive Brexit means acknowledging the various ethnic groups that live in the UK, and accepting them as the differing cultural groups that they are. Assimilation can begin once there is a general acknowledgement of culture and the identity that is contingent on this culture. Rather than ignoring...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
7 Votes
Comments 2
Nithya Reddy

According to a Guardian article, the pound reached a 10-month low this July and increased interest rates have put projected economic data in turmoil. After reading this article, Brexit's impact on both the UK's and European Union's economic is negative. Lower immigration can actually add to the NHS debt, further hurting economic growth. 

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
8 Votes
Comments 2
Nithya Reddy

Britain is rooted in slavery and racism. The shipping docks and sugar cane supplies were located in the heart of London, and the assimilation of Africans into daily English life has been a constant uphill battle. Brexit proved that they, including other minorities, have lost that battle. The increasing difficulty of immigration towards ethnic minorities proves that both colorism and racism has been present in Britain throughout it's long history. Brexit, in all honesty, only revealed this...

Nithya Reddy
by Nithya Reddy
8 Votes
Comments 1
Nithya Reddy
 

Nithya Reddy

United Kingdom

Joined this community on Sep 11, 2018

What age category are you in?
19-21

What gender do you identify as?
Female

What nationality are you? (you may list more than one)
United States

Which town or city do you live in?
King’s Cross

Highest level of education
High School Graduate

Other qualifications
None

Employment status
Student

Attitude towards Brexit
Bad

If you are a student, which school/college/university are you at
New York University

Do you think there should be a second referendum on Brexit?
Yes

Have developments since the 2016 Brexit Referendum made you feel
N/A

Have developments since the 2016 Brexit Referendum made you feel
N/A

Reputation ranking

Ranking
3
Points
2730
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